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1 month

General Impression:
Sleeping and eating is a major focus for baby. Baby is comforted by caregiver and relies on caregiver to meet physical and emotional needs.  

Positive Social-Emotional Skills (including social relations)
The infant is responding to the people around him; he stops crying when he sees someone’s face, hears a voice or when he is picked up and held.

Acquisition and Use of Knowledge and Skills (including early language/communication)
Baby looks at colorful toys briefly and focuses on objects as far away as three feet. He responds to voices and can already recognize his parent’s voice.

Ability to Take Actions to Get Needs Met

Controls Body to Get Wants and Needs Met
In order to look at people or respond to a noise, baby can slightly lift his head off parent’s shoulder or floor when on tummy and can turn head to both sides when lying on back. Baby’s hands are often fisted and therefore baby is not yet holding onto toys, but may use a reflexive grasp to hold onto a caregiver’s finger.  

Self Care (Feeding, Dressing & Toileting)
Baby is able to coordinate his suck and swallow when breastfeeding or being fed from a bottle.

Makes Wants and Needs Known
He cries to let his caregivers know when he is hungry or uncomfortable. He may stop crying when picked up and held.

2 months

General Impression:
Sleeping patterns are becoming more predictable. Baby is more alert and reacts to caregivers by watching them and moving arms/legs in response to caregivers.

Positive Social-Emotional Skills (including social relations)
The baby is responding positively to her Mom and Dad. She gets excited when Mom or Dad comes in the room, and may cry when her Mother leaves the room. She is beginning to notice other people and shows excitement by smiling and moving her arms and legs.

Acquisition and Use of Knowledge and Skills (including early language/communication)
Baby is beginning to be able to focus on people and objects further away from her (2-4 feet). She can visually recognize her parent and she stares and gazes at a toy or Mom or Dad. She is beginning to make single vowel sounds.

Ability to Take Actions to Get Needs Met

Controls Body to Get Wants and Needs Met
Baby is increasing her ability to move and control her body in response to a caregiver and she may be seen kicking her legs or straightening them out. Baby can also roll to her back from her side to look for a caregiver. She will be able to use her forearms to lift her head when lying on her tummy, which will begin her ability to explore toys, faces, etc.

Self Care (Feeding, Dressing & Toileting)
Baby can coordinate several sucks before swallowing when nursing or bottle-feeding. Leakage is minimal.

Makes Wants and Needs Known
Cries begin to have differentiated tones for hunger, etc..  
 

3 months

General Impression:
Interest in watching the faces of people talking to baby increases dramatically from the prior month. Crying diminishes as baby is interested in exploring the room and faces visually. Baby is starting to roll which allows him to look for toys or faces. He is beginning to look around while on his tummy. He tolerates being on his tummy without being uncomfortable in the position.

Positive Social-Emotional Skills (including social relations)
The baby is showing a greater interest in people than objects by focusing longer on human faces than any objects. He looks closely at the face and eyes of the person talking to him. He may coo when talked to and has begun to give a small chuckle or laugh.

Acquisition and Use of Knowledge and Skills (including early language/communication)
Baby is learning about his hands by bringing them close to his face and watching them, and also by mouthing them. He recognizes his bottle. He is learning through his sense of hearing in addition to his vision – looking around the room when he hears a sound and cooing when talked to.
He continues to use his vision to learn, looking back and forth between toys, and looking at the face and eyes of the person talking to him. He still prefers human faces, but will look around the room to others and objects.

Ability to Take Actions to Get Needs Met

Controls Body to Get Wants and Needs Met
Baby is much more in control of his head and looks around from many positions (lying on back, being held at shoulder, lying on tummy). This allows him the opportunity to begin to seek out his toys or explore with his eyes.

Baby should tolerate being on his tummy and even use the time on his tummy to lift up on his forearms and begin to lift on straight arms to look at his caregiver or others in his environment. He can sit upright on someone’s lap with support and turn his head to look around.

Self Care (Feeding, Dressing & Toileting)
Several sucks before swallowing

Makes Wants and Needs Known
Definite cry for hunger distinguishable by caregivers

4 months

General Impression:
Baby is able to hold her toys and will take some of those toys to her mouth for further exploration.

Baby recognizes familiar people and will get excited, smile, vocalize and reach out for caregiver.

Baby is rolling off of her tummy to get a fuller view of the world or communicate with caregiver.

Positive Social-Emotional Skills (including social relations)
The baby vocalizes, smiles, and reaches out to a familiar person and may laugh aloud when playing. She may get upset and cry if her play is interrupted.

Vocalizes and jabbers when left alone. She may show distress when she hears an angry voice and laugh aloud when playing.

Acquisition and Use of Knowledge and Skills (including early language/communication)
Watches movement of her own hands and will follow a dangling toy or object with her eyes. She gets excited when she sees her preparing her bottle.

She reaches for toys and is able to grasp a toy for a few seconds. She may bring the toy to her mouth.

She turns her head toward a voice or the sound of a rattle.

Ability to Take Actions to Get Needs Met

Controls Body to Get Wants and Needs Met
Baby is getting stronger and can tolerate being on her tummy with her head and chest up for longer periods of time. Baby has also figured out that she can elicit noise from toys by shaking them. She may not have perfect control when shaking, but it is purposeful. Baby can hold a toy in her hand for a few seconds and her interest in doing so can be seen by her work to reach towards a toy.

Self Care (Feeding, Dressing & Toileting)
May place both hands on bottle
Pats bottle

Makes Wants and Needs Known
Distinct cries for multiple needs - hunger, fatigue, pain.

5 months

General Impression:
Baby has an increased interest in toys now and has become interactive with caregivers as seen in baby’s social interactions, such as giggling and imitating faces. Baby can distinguish the difference between happy and angry voices.

Positive Social-Emotional Skills (including social relations)
Baby is engaging with others through cooing as if in a conversation. He laughs aloud when someone talks to or tickles him. He enjoys hearing and will respond by cooing or moving around. He can definitely distinguish between friendly and angry voices.

Acquisition and Use of Knowledge and Skills (including early language/communication)
Baby has new ways of playing with toys including exploring them with his mouth. He will turn his head and look when a toy is dropped.

His social skills also impact learning as he will imitate a few simple facial expressions and laugh aloud when tickled or talked to.

Ability to Take Actions to Get Needs Met

Controls Body to Get Wants and Needs Met
Baby is getting more sophisticated with holding toys and can even hold a toy in both hands at the same time. If he drops a toy, he will look for it, then pick it back up – if it is still interesting to him.

Self Care (Feeding, Dressing & Toileting)
May begin taking food from a spoon.
Places both hands on bottle during feeding

Makes Wants and Needs Known
Baby continues to cry to get primary needs met, but may also use cooing or smiles to get social needs met.

6 months

General Impression:
Baby is much more mobile now as she is able to roll and is showing signs of early prop sitting. Baby is making many sounds and enjoys smiling. Baby turns quickly to a caregiver’s voice.

Positive Social-Emotional Skills (including social relations)
Baby recognizes her parent’s voice and turns immediately when she hears it across the room.
Her first separation anxiety is beginning as she can now distinguish strangers from those who are in her family circle.
She smiles and vocalizes to her image in the mirror and she gets excited when hearing someone nearby.
She lets others know she is interested in engaging with them through vocalizing and waving her arms.
Baby coos or babbles when happy and she smiles a lot when playing.

Acquisition and Use of Knowledge and Skills (including early language/communication)
Baby is interested in her toys and actively reaches for them in play. She consistently puts the toys and other objects into her mouth while playing. When she drops a toy, she looks for it, showing she remembers that it exists even when out of sight.

She is imitating simple sounds as well as facial expressions. She smiles, vocalizes and pats at her own image in a mirror.

Ability to Take Actions to Get Needs Met

Controls Body to Get Wants and Needs Met
Baby is rolling in all directions to get to toys and caregiver. She can sit in a high chair for mealtime and has found a toy in her feet and toes as she enjoys playing with them. Parents may enjoy standing their child up on their lap and baby also gets excited to be in this taller posture – she may respond positively (i.e. laughing, smiling, cooing, holding the position, etc.) to continue to be held in this upright position.

Self Care (Feeding, Dressing & Toileting)
Baby is able to hold her bottle easily. She rakes up cheerios with her fingers against palm of hand (if opportunity exists). She is also able to pick up a sippy cup with a handle, but may not yet have opportunity for this experience.

Makes Wants and Needs Known
Distinct cry/behavior for different needs

Click here to find Typical developmental information Click here for ages 1 through 6 months developmental milestones Click here for ages 7 through 12 months developmental milestones Click here for ages 13 through 24 months developmental milestones Click here for ages 27 through 36 months developmental milestones


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